Putting Your Best Face Forward During Your Remote Interview

Although we all may want to see things get ‘back to normal’ as soon as possible, the Coronavirus and its aftermath may be with us for quite a while – especially when it comes to interviewing for jobs.
A recent article in The Muse succinctly stated that “As the ground continues to shift under our feet, companies are working to adjust their recruiting, interviewing and hiring processes to fit the circumstances.”
One big change is the shift to remote interviewing when filling a position. But when it comes down to the remote-interview process itself, these things haven’t changed:


• Dress professionally
• Arrive early (that is, connect to the on-line portal about five-to-10 minutes early)
• Do your research so you can best ‘sell’ your experience and show how you can contribute to the employer
• Ask questions
• Send a thank-you note after the interview


While one benefit of the remote interview is that you get to do it from the comfort of your home, that comes with its own set of challenges – so make sure you do the following before the interview so you’re as comfortable as possible when the time comes:


• Practice doing both phone and video interviews
• Test your microphone (and headphones) in advance with a family member, friend, business colleague, etc.
• Make sure the height of your laptop and room lighting are adjusted for a visually-pleasing presentation (check out our previous blog – Zoom Rules – for more tips)
• Plan ahead to avoid as many ‘unplanned’ disruptions as possible (roommates walking in the background, barking dogs, etc.)


Also, if the job you are interviewing is also a ‘remote position,’ your potential employer will be looking for a candidate who has the ability to work well from home, so make sure to highlight your ability to be self-motivated and your communications skills (ability to work well on the phone and by email/digitally).
The Muse also notes that you should be prepared to “talk about how you handle challenges, as hiring managers are looking for positivity and resilience during these difficult times.”
For more details on interviewing in our current environment, check out the full article at The Muse.