Confident Career Strategies

Stewart says that the first step in preparing for an interview is to conduct a thorough inventory of your skills and accomplishments. A sort of personal SWOT analysis: Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats. Knowing your strengths and weaknesses in a competitive market can help you prepare to answer tough questions in the interview. These are internal qualities, whereas Opportunities and Threats are environmental qualities. What outside factors might influence the market for your skills? Is your programming language of choice being phased out? Are you an early adopter of some technique or technology? Being aware of industry trends helps you position yourself within a larger context. Continue reading “Confident Career Strategies”…

The Improv Effect

Jessie Shternshus has been studying and practicing improv since she was 11 years old; she’s a professional actor and performs regularly at the Comedy Zone. But she insists that you don’t have to be a professional actor or comedian to use the skill; you already use it every day in conversation. Continue reading “The Improv Effect”…

Fit at Forty Plus

Your energy level is part of your personal brand, along with your appearance and confidence. If you could find a fix that improved your posture, amped up your energy level, made your confidence skyrocket and took years off your appearance, would you buy it? Maybe? What if it were free? Heck yes – sign me up. Continue reading “Fit at Forty Plus”…

Become More Charismatic

Embed from Getty Images ’ve been sharing tips from Charlie Houpert, the 20-something author of Charisma on Command:… Continue reading “Become More Charismatic”…

Are You Coachable?

To be coachable, a player needs to be open to the idea that he has room to improve. That attitude is in direct opposition to what got that player to the big leagues in the first place: huge confidence and unswerving belief that s/he’s the best of the best. Continue reading “Are You Coachable?”…

Failing Well

It’s the other F word: failure. We know intellectually that we learn more from our mistakes than from our successes, but each failure still feels like a kick in the gut. Continue reading “Failing Well”…